Info For - Domestic Violence - Statistics

Info For Domestic Violence
Statistics

Domestic Violence Statistics

The intimacy of a relationship is not to be confused with the partner’s abusive behavior.

Violence in the home is not something to be kept behind a closed door, no matter how embarrassing it may feel. The abuser’s main tool that makes it possible to continue the abuse is silence. Remember, you are not alone. No matter how much an abusive partner professes “love”, it is not possible to systematically abuse the person one truly loves. The abuser is more than likely confusing feelings of lust and power with the word “love”.

Did You Know? Domestic violence costs the U.S. economy an estimated $6 billion annually.

According to the American Institute of Domestic Violence, the health-related costs of rape, physical assault, stalking, and homicide by partners is nearly $6 billion each year. Of this total, $4 billion is for victims requiring direct medical and mental health care services. Domestic violence victims lose nearly 8.0 million days of paid work each year. This lost productivity, absenteeism and earnings lost amounts to almost $2 billion annually.

Domestic violence against a partner or child is a crime. There are domestic abuse laws forbidding anyone to physically harm or harass another person in the home. These include laws such as the Domestic Violence Act and the Violence Against Women Act.

Violence in the home is not something to be kept behind a closed door, no matter how embarrassing it may feel. The intimacy of a relationship is not to be confused with the partner’s abusive behavior.

The abuser’s main tool that makes it possible to continue the abuse is silence. Remember, you are not alone. One woman in four is abused in some way during her life.

No matter how much an abusive partner professes “love”, it is not possible to systematically abuse the person one truly loves. The abuser is more than likely confusing feelings of lust and power with the word “love”.

If you are in an abusive relationship, you need to speak to someone you trust, family or friend, and start a plan to get yourself out of the situation. If it has gone so far that you have lost contact with those you used to confide in, resume at least one of those relationships. A strong relationship with someone outside the abusive relationship is imperative.

Protect Yourself and Your Children From Domestic Violence.
CALL 911 for immediate assistance,
or your local emergency service.